Constellations of Camelopardalis and Auriga
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Camelopardalis and Auriga
Roll mouse over picture to see constellation figures and outlines
Image and text ©2008 Akira Fujii/David Malin Images.

In the picture above, north is at the top and the image covers 61.8 x 71.2 degrees.
Image centre is located at 23:37:29.0, +57:09:26 (H:M:S, D:M:S, J2000) Astrometric data from Astrometry.net.

Camelopardalis and Auriga
Best seen in the early evening in February

Camlopardalis (the Giraffe, sometimes given as Camelopardis) is aptly named, both for the stick figure outlined above, which hints the outline of a giraffe's legs and sloping back, and for huge extent of constellation as it wanders over the North Celestial Pole, covering over 70 degrees. An alternative way to connect the stars for a more giraffe-like shape appears as a second diagram in the Wikipadia entry for this constellation. This meandering construction is probably the work of the Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius in about 1613 and for its size (757 square degrees) it contains remarkably few bright stars.

Though prominent and complete here, Auriga has its own page. Given its size and location in the northern sky, it is remarkable that Camelopardalis has no named stars.

Named stars in Auriga: (Greek alphabet)
Elnath (El Nath, γ Aur = β Tau), Almaaz (ε Aur), Capella (Alhajoth, α Aur), Haedus I ( Sadatoni, ζ Aur), Haedus II (η Aur), Hassaleh (Kabdhilinan, ι Aur), Mahasim (θ Aur), Menkalinan (β Aur).

Constellations adjoining Camelopardalis and Auriga:  
Cassiopeia, Cepheus, Draco, Gemini, Lynx, Perseus, Taurus, Ursa Major, Ursa Minor.

Related images (other sources)
INT 2.           The nucleus of M31 (unsharp mask image)
INT 6.           M33 (NGC 589), the Pinwheel galaxy, wide field

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David Malin, 2015 February 27.